7 Best Heated Ski Gloves & Mittens for Warm Hands This Winter (2020)
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There are few things that are less fun than frozen fingers, and this is even worse when you’re skiing or snowboarding. If you find yourself constantly battling with cold hands and fingers while out on the slopes, and a normal pair of ski gloves or mittens doesn’t seem to keep you warm, you may want to consider purchasing a pair of heated gloves (or mittens). These rechargeable, insulated gloves will keep your hands warm using external heat, meaning that they’ll keep your hands warm on the slopes much better than a non-heated pair. We’ve created this review of the best heated ski gloves and mittens to help you choose a pair that fits your budget and needs.

What to Look For When Buying Heated Ski Gloves & Heated Ski Mittens

Warmth

The #1 most important characteristic of any pair of gloves or mittens is their ability to keep your hands warm. With heated gloves, you’ll want to look for two things: the intensity of the heat settings and the insulation of the glove itself.

Heat settings range from glove to glove and different people require different levels of heat to feel warm and comfortable. Most heated gloves have a few different heat settings you can choose from and adjust as needed depending on the temperature outside. Even so, the lowest and highest heat settings can range drastically from product to product, so it’s important to try out a few pairs before you choose one to take with you on the slopes.

There’s also an issue with some gloves and mittens of too much heat – because they’re electrically powered, some gloves can get extra toasty and make your hands sweaty or chapped. Remember: you’ll also be generating some heat from your hands, especially when you’re moving around, so using the gloves while stationary will be different than using them while skiing or snowboarding.

Lastly, you’ll want to make sure the gloves feel warm without being turned on. There’s a chance your batteries will die or you’ll forget to charge them, and the last thing you want is a pair of gloves that doesn’t keep you warm when that happens. When you try out a pair of gloves, be sure to test the heat settings and the general insulation of the glove without the heated elements turned on.

Weatherproofing

This should be self-explanatory, but you’ll also want your gloves to be completely weatherproof. Good weatherproofing will prevent moisture from getting into your gloves and cooling down your fingers and hands. It will also ensure internal heat stays inside the glove instead of escaping out into the air. The best heated ski gloves will be waterproof and windproof to ensure your hands get as much heat as possible.

Battery Life

One extra characteristic to research before you buy is the battery life of the heating system. If you’re the kind of person (like us) who tends to spend hours on the slopes each day, a longer battery life is critical for comfort and warmth throughout the day. The last thing you want is for the gloves to work when it’s warmer out, and then die when you’re night skiing in colder temperatures.

There’s also a difference between the battery life on lower heat settings vs. higher settings. Typically, batteries will burn much more quickly on higher settings, so if you’re craving more warmth, we’d suggest making sure the lower settings are warm enough for you for most conditions so you’re not constantly burning your batteries in a few hours.

Dexterity

With gloves especially, dexterity is something you may want to consider when purchasing a heated pair. You’ll want to make sure you can use your hands well enough in your gloves, and that they’re not too bulky or inflexible to do things like adjusting your helmet/goggles or using your zippers. Mittens, unfortunately, will never have great dexterity, but again, you should try out every pair to test for the ability to use your zippers and move your hands as needed.

Comfort & Fit

One of the most important characteristics to consider when choosing a pair of heated ski mittens or gloves is fit. You’ll want them to fit snugly on your hands, but they shouldn’t be too tight that they’re uncomfortable or prevent movement. This will vary from person to person, which is why we strongly recommend ordering a couple of pairs and returning the ones that don’t work out so you can try them on and choose the pair that feels the best on your own hands.

Price

Because heated ski gloves are premium products that require a battery and charging set, they’re much more expensive than normal gloves and mittens. With that said, there’s a huge range in pricing of the best heated ski gloves, typically between $70 and $400 for a pair that includes the batteries and charger. Depending on your budget and your desire for more bells and whistles, you can definitely find a solid pair within that range that will work well and keep your hands warm.

Best Heated Ski Gloves & Mittens – Our Review

We did the research on over a dozen of the most popular and best heated ski gloves, and narrowed our recommendations down to 5 options:

Outdoor Research Lucent Gloves & Mittens

Outdoor Research makes tons of great cold weather gear, and their Lucent Heated Gloves (and heated mittens) are some of the most popular options out there. There are several products in Outdoor Research’s heated handwear lines, but the Lucent is one of the least expensive and most mass market-friendly. (Some of the more expensive options are around $500+…ouch!) Hailed by skiers and snowboarders as a great glove for winter sports, you’ll find a high quality build with a mixture of leather and synthetic materials on the outer shell and soft fleece on the inner lining.

Some customers complain that the heating of the glove is weaker than expected, although this varied from person to person. They’re also quite expensive, which turns many people off to these gloves as well. If you do opt to purchase a pair, be sure to order them from a place like REI or Backcountry where there’s a good return policy.

  • Pros: Durable, solid construction, decent dexterity in gloves
  • Cons: Expensive, inconsistent heating quality

Savior Heated Gloves

Savior makes a more affordable heated glove that’s great for skiing, snowboarding, and other winter outdoor activities. With a mid-level price point and a strong, durable build, these heated gloves offer a really nice balance between the high-end, premium (read: expensive) heated gloves and the more affordable ones. They’ve got a blend of lambskin and synthetic materials on the outer shell and a soft inner lining, which provides plenty of comfort and insulation whether the glove is on or off.

Some customers complained of a short battery life, which can be a huge deal breaker when you’re planning to be out on the slopes for several hours. One reviewer said the battery lasts just 2.5 hours, which isn’t even close to a full day of skiing. Additionally, the fingers seem to have inconsistent ability to be used with touch screens, which could be an important feature for some. Lastly, the interior is made of cotton, so in terms of keeping moisture at bay, there are other better options out there.

  • Pros: Affordable, most popular option, 40% lambskin construction is a nice balance between high-end leather and synthetics, durable
  • Cons: Short battery life, inconsistent touch screen functionality, cotton interior is not great for moisture-wicking

Volt Resistance Polar X 7V Heated Gloves

Originally made as work gloves, the Volt Resistance Polar X gloves are built to last in extreme conditions and lots of wear. Perhaps the most durable gloves on our list, these Volt Resistance Polar X gloves aren’t cheap, but they will certainly last. Hailed as a fantastic glove by people who work in conditions as harsh as rural Alaska, these gloves are a great value for the money and will keep your hands nice and toasty on the slopes. With an outer shell made of durable nylon and an outer storage pocket, these gloves scream functionality and they’re great for lots of use on the slopes.

With that said, there are definitely more premium gloves out there (and on our list) that feature leather shells, which offer a bit more flexibility and dexterity. These gloves are much bulkier and more cumbersome in comparison. Additionally, some say that the heating system doesn’t extend all the way to the very tips of the fingers, which could be a significant detractor from an otherwise great product.

  • Pros: Built for heavy use and durability, whole-hand heating system, good battery life
  • Cons: High price for a non-leather glove, bulky

VELAZZIO Thermo1 Battery Heated Gloves

VELAZZIO makes heated outerwear, and their budget heated ski gloves come at a price that’s more affordable than many non-heated options. These gloves are by far the least expensive option on our list, but still remain competitive against the other, premium products. Waterproof, insulated, and touchscreen-friendly, they’re a perfect option Plus, many customers are very pleased with the customer service and responsiveness from the company, which is a great sign in the event you need to return or exchange them for any reason.

What you won’t find is all the bells and whistles some of the more premium products offer. The battery life is a little bit shorter, and the insulation is a little bit thinner. The entire glove is made of synthetic materials rather than the high-end leather you’ll see in more expensive gloves. This is truly a no-frills heated glove, but it will keep your hands warm at a much lower price than any of the other options out there.

  • Pros: Affordable, fully waterproof, thick fleece liner
  • Cons: Fully synthetic materials, shorter battery life than some others

Seirus HeatTouch Hellfire Gloves & Mittens

Seirus makes some of the most high-quality, premium heated gloves and mittens on the market, but you’ll pay a very pretty penny for them. The HeatTouch Hellfire gloves have everything you could ever want – a long-lasting battery with a fantastic, evenly distributed heating system, plus a weatherproof leather outer shell that’s flexible for optimal dexterity. They’re lightweight but durable and will keep all of the elements out (while keeping warmth in), and will definitely last years and years if you take good care of them.

However, remember that pretty penny we mentioned? It’s by far the most expensive product we considered, and is more than we could ever imagine paying for a pair of gloves (heated or made of solid gold or otherwise). If you opt to pay the hefty price tag, know you’ll truly be getting the best option on the market.

  • Pros: Majority leather outer shell, HeatLock™ insulation, warm and comfortable inner liner, all-around a very high-quality option with good battery life (12+ hours on lowest setting)
  • Cons: Extremely expensive

Best Heated Ski Mittens & Gloves: Our Final Recommendations

If your budget isn’t constrained, we’d strongly recommend getting the Seirus HeatTouch Hellfire Heated Gloves OR Mittens. These are the best heated ski gloves on the market, and although they’re quite pricey, they offer the best glove construction combined with a top-of-the-line heating system. They’ll surely keep your hands warm and dry, and should last for years if you take good care of them.

For those who are on a tighter budget, we’d also recommend the VELAZZIO Thermo1 Gloves – they’re the least expensive option on our list, but they still work well and will provide your hands with heat and comfort on the slopes (without requiring you to spend an arm and a leg to buy them). This is the pair we ended up going with for the slopes and we’re very satisfied with the purchase.

Let us know what you end up going with (and how you like them!) in the comments below. 🙂

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Kay Rodriguez is the Chicago-based travel writer and photographer behind Jetfarer and Skyline Adventurer. When she's not blogging furiously on her laptop or editing photos, you can find Kay running, hiking, or paddling in a new city.

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